Friday, December 12, 2014

Spending bill would open campaign money spigot

WASHINGTON — Wealthy political donors could write seven-figure checks to national political parties under a measure tucked into Congress' massive spending bill — upending long-standing limits on contributions.

Source: Spending bill would open campaign money spigot

Are we witnessing the death of campaign finance reform? This guy hopes so.

One of the main points of contention in the cromnibus spending bill that (barely) passed the House late Thursday night was a provision that drastically increased the ability of individuals to donate to national party committees.

Source: Are we witnessing the death of campaign finance reform? This guy hopes so.

Democratic lawyer crafted campaign finance deal

Marc Elias, a partner at the Seattle-based law firm Perkins Coie, was called in to advise outgoing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s aides on the campaign finance proposal on Tuesday, as they negotiated it with representatives from House Speaker John Boehner’s office, multiple sources confirm.

Source: Democratic lawyer crafted campaign finance deal

Thursday, December 11, 2014

FEC meeting pits commission against itself

In the Federal Election Commission's second-to-last open meeting of 2014, commissioners split over a measure that would prohibit agency lawyers from conducting independent investigations without prior approval from the chronically gridlocked panel. For Chairman Lee Goodman, the agency's top Republican, the move would simply standardize the enforcement process and ensure that commissioners, their lawyers and the respondents are all on the same page. In Democrat Ellen Weintraub's eyes, however, it is another veiled attempt by Republicans to block the enforcement of campaign finance laws: "If you ignore information, then it makes it easier to get to 'no' [action], which is the position of some folks."

FEC meeting pits commission against itself - Sunlight Foundation Blog

Just how daunting is the money chase for 2016?

By the time of the 2016 election, the two major-party nominees will have raised more than $1 billion. But securing the nomination, just to get to the general election, will require raising in excess of $100 million. Spencer Zwick, who ran Mitt Romney’s strong fundraising operation in 2012, said: “It’s just as hard to raise $100 million for the primary as it will be to raise $1 billion for the general. . . . In the primary, every contribution you get, you are asking for it. You’re working a lot harder for those dollars.”

Just how daunting is the money chase for 2016? - The Washington Post

DSCC left with $20.4M in post-election debt

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is stuck with $20.4 million in post-election debt, more than twice the debt owed by its Republican counterpart and a challenge for the party as it heads into the next cycle. The atypically high figure helps explain why the DSCC spent no money on advertisements for Sen. Mary Landrieu during the Louisiana runoff, though few expected the Democratic incumbent to be able to overcome her deficit in the polls.

DSCC left with $20.4M in post-election debt - James Hohmann - POLITICO

People expect almost nothing from Washington. And, for once, Washington delivers.

Washington politicians are doing an absolutely fantastic job ... of setting really low expectations for themselves. People have hated Congress for quite a long time now. But that hate has slowly morphed into something even more troubling: Pervasive pessimism. Witness this new poll from AP-GfK. After the 2010 election, in which Republicans won control of the House thanks to the tea party revolution, two AP-GfK polls showed at least four in 10 Americans expressed at least some confidence that the GOP could work with President Obama to address the nation's problems -- 41 percent in November 2010 and 48 percent in January 2011.

People expect almost nothing from Washington. And, for once, Washington delivers. - The Washington Post